A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Google, the apostles and who we are January 13, 2014

Filed under: sermon — bweier001 @ 1:48 am
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It’s probably not going to shock anyone if I tell you that our world and culture has undergone radical change in the past 50 years or so. We have experienced massive shifts in nearly every aspect of our lives and it has molded, shaped and reoriented how we think, relate to one another, our vocations and how we communicate . In these shifts, we have learned to take in information at a rate that was unthinkable 50 years ago. Today’s teenagers absorb more data in a day than those of us that are over 30 did in a month at their age. We have these powerful computers that we carry in our pockets. Don’t know something? Google it! Want people to think you know something? Google it! We can know almost anything for our selves and the idea of “experts” is a thing of the past. We can find out how almost anything works in a matter of seconds and we love it! We are now our own expert and because of this we now think that we can control more of our lives and able keep up with the all the changes around us.
Some of the side effects, if you will, of the ability to see and know how everything works, is that we get overwhelmed by the amount of information, by the amount of change, the amount of what we can’t control and we begin to doubt what it is that we actually DO know. So, we put on blinders and think that if we can just figure out how to control our little corner of the world, our daily lives, then we might be able to navigate all of this. But question that I think remains is, if everything around us is changing rapidly then who are we in all of this? What is our role and identity?
All of these massive culture shifts have impacted the institutional church in profound ways and the clash of culture and institutional church has caused many to completely rethink or walk away entirely from a relationship with God. Many people now claim that any sort of God or deity, holy scriptures or faith community doesn’t make a dimes worth of difference in their daily lives and any identity as a child of God is irrelevant. They can just be good people, living a good life, and they don’t need the hypocrisy of Christianity or so called Christian people. Here’s the rub-in some ways that’s all true. It is possible to just toodle along in life without reading ancient words, praying, eating, sharing joys and sorrows with a community of people who proclaim that above all the technology, science, medical advancements is a God who simply wants to love all people and draw all people into relationship. It’s possible to think that this life is all that there is and nothing more. It’s possible to rationalize anything that can’t be explained readily by science and to ignore the mystery of our full humanness-physical and spiritual. It’s possible to just think as people, we are who we are and nothing can change that. I think if we were all honest, we have to admit to at one point or another wondering what difference Jesus makes in our lives and in our identity.
I don’t think our time is so different than that of the early church that we read about in Acts this morning. The first apostles were now dealing with the fact that they were proclaiming a messiah that was now no longer visible-God’s son that had come to dwell among them in the flesh had been crucified, buried, raised and had returned to God. The tangible evidence was gone and so now it rested on them to tell people were about their experiences with Jesus, the difference he had made in their lives, the importance of the community together, how Jesus had changed their whole outlook on themselves, and the world around them. And in doing this, their very identity had shifted from disciple of Jesus to apostle-sent into the world.
The early apostles were struggling with how and to whom to tell this story of God’s amazing love and grace to a world that didn’t really want to hear it, couldn’t understand it but was desperate for it at the same time. Initially, they shared it only with other Jewish people. Kinda an easier sell because the Jewish people already believed in God and knew the prophets and the story of God. But here in chapter 10, Peter and the others have a new problem: they discover that God is working outside of their expectations and their comfort zone. They discovered God started working in the secular, Gentile, unbelieving world. Now what? Can God work through these people who have never even read the Torah or the prophets? But what if they don’t believe and act the same way as us? They will eat different food and use different language and just are…different.
An existential crisis for sure. The apostles probably intrinsically knew that these Gentile’s differences were bound to rub off on them and cause them change somehow too. How much change is ok while still being faithful to the core message? What were they to do?
In a rare moment of clarity for Peter, he catches a glimpse that this message of love, grace and mercy cannot be contained and kept neat. That the love of God in Jesus Christ has been let loose in the world and DOES make a difference in the world-more than he could even realize! So much so that even Gentiles-gasp-wanted to know more, wanted to care for those who are on the outside of society, wanted to hear the story and know that they were loved. In Jesus, they realized there is a hope that can’t be found anywhere else. Not just hope for life after death, but hope for the world not to always be what it is, hope for peace to be the rule, hope for the sick to be whole, hope for the hungry to be fed and the lonely to be in community. What difference Jesus made for the Gentiles was that God offered them, these supposed outsiders, the opportunity each and everyday to participate fully in this hope. They were a part of something beyond themselves.
The apostles themselves were awakened to how much Jesus does make a difference– because in Jesus Christ, God says that all people are loved and have worth, not just those with whom the apostles were comfortable. In Jesus Christ, God showed us how we live together as God’s people. The Gentiles grasped that in midst of everything else in their lives– what was foundational was this love and belonging and opened up the apostles to the depth and breadth of Gods love.
In Acts 10, we hear Peter’s moment of suddenly realizing that God was truly for all, no matter what. Just when we think that we know how God will work in the world, God will do a new thing. Peter and the apostles and later Paul, recognized this shift, that God was working in questioning, in wondering, in the secular, in the stranger, in the outsider and in the unknown. God’s love was transforming the world in ways that looked like shifting sand to the apostles but was more certain than ever to those experiencing it for the first time.
Our culture and society has changed and is still changing and it is important that we acknowledge that and, like the apostles, learn how to proclaim the good news of Gods love in this particular place and time. But our basic identity of beloved children of God is the unchangeable promise that we all share. We know from the Bible that God’s love and grace transcends culture and that God promises to be with us always. We are reminded of this in the waters of baptism, in the bread and in the wine, in the hearing together of the story of God’s unconditional love. This is what we know will never change even when everything else around us does. Thanks be to God.

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Don’t just have a Happy New Year January 1, 2014

Filed under: Uncategorized — bweier001 @ 3:21 am

A long December and there’s reason to believe maybe this year will be better than the last.” These are the opening lines to the Counting Crows song “Long December.” I love this song as it feeds my occasional melancholy and wistfulness about the present and the future. It HAS been a long December-not just personally but it seems for much of the world. We have had another school shooting, bombs in Russia, bitter cold, deaths, people experiencing very traumatic life situations that will not have a positive resolution, and the list could go on and on.

On New Year’s Eve a bit of reflection on the past and wondering about the future seems appropriate. (Don’t analyze the fact that I am blogging and not at some wild and crazy NYE party…Yes I am old, have children and tired.) I have had some REALLY bad years in the past and New Year’s Eve was a relief-the idea being that it couldn’t possibly get any worse, right? (Well, there was this one year where it actually did get worse.) And other years where things hadn’t been so bad so is the other shoe going to fall in the coming year so to speak? It seems that NYE lends itself for many of us to try and become mystics or fortune tellers. Sometimes, sadly, we do know what the inevitable outcome of the future might be but I was wondering today, as I was putting away groceries, is with almost everything else is do we really want to know? Good or bad? Does it matter?

I am not sure it does. If I know what I will be doing a year from today, it takes all of the wonder and awe out of our life journey, even if it’s not positive. I also think not knowing what the coming year will bring keeps us grounded in the present, attentive to the here and now and to the people with whom we are occupying this time and space.

When I do think of the coming year, what I mostly hope for is for more of what I have today. The more love in community and family, more joy in welcoming new people into those circles (family is who you love-not just who you are genetically related to), more of the movement of the Holy Spirit moving in the world, more recognizing the holy in the ordinary, more of the honor of journeying with those who grieve and struggle and more of the knowing the grace and mercy of God in my life and in the lives of all people. May you not just have a Happy New Year, but a new year of knowing the new life we have been given through Christ, a new year of deep and abiding love and a new year of knowing that no matter what does happen, whether our months are long an arduous or joyful, God is present.