A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

One in Christ February 5, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — bweier001 @ 7:06 pm
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Preached Wednesday Feb. 1, 2017 at Bethany Lutheran

Galatians 3:27-28 New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

27 As many of you as were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. 28 There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus.

What are some labels that we give each other or even ourselves? What about when you’re born, what’s the first label that you often receive besides perhaps your name? We get many labels from the first day we are born don’t we? Why do you think we do that? Lots of reasons-are they all “bad” reasons per se? No, of course not, but can labels be taken too far? Yep! Have you ever been given a label that you don’t like but it’s hard to shake it? Or perhaps, it’s not that you don’t like your label, but it’s not always helpful or other people may not appreciate your label. We tend to label people, even for good and right reasons, and the take it too far. We point out distinctions in each other, not to celebrate diversity and gifts, but often to decide who’s in and who’s out, who has power and control and who doesn’t, who’s weird and who’s “normal.” And before any of you start feeling guilty, my point is not guilt, it’s to point out the universalism of this behavior-we all do it! If someone says to you that they don’t see distinctions in people, they are lying. Of course we see distinctions! That’s not the issue! The challenge comes with what we do with those labels and distinctions.

The people of Galatia were so excited about this good news of being loved by God that they wanted to learn everything that they could about it. And they stumbled upon the laws from the OT. All of the laws of what to eat, what to wear, how to act, etc. They began to think that doing these laws was what made them faithful and matter to God. And if you followed the laws better than other people, well, then you were like a super mega Christian and you would matter even MORE to God. Maybe you would get a special cape or hat to signify how special you were in the community.  And the people of Galatia were no different than any of the rest of us and they were also using these laws to label people, how to sort out who has power, who is a real follower of Jesus and who is in or out of this new community. They were competing for status with one another. Who’s the cool kid, the smart one, the best behaved, the most loving, etc.

So Paul writes to them to say no! I can almost see Paul’s eyes rolling as he writes to them. He says, you guys! You are all important to God not because of what you do but because of who Christ is! And Christ is the one who gives us faith, who freely gives us grace, forgiveness, who showers us with love and reminds us that our labels, our distinctions, don’t matter to God and don’t matter in the body of Christ. The Galatians have forgotten that faith is not about what you do, the laws you keep, but who are as part of the body of Christ. Paul writes in v. 27 that in baptism we are clothed with Christ, and that means that we now ALL look like Christ!! You’re a female? You look like Christ. You’re a male, you look like Christ. You’re short? You look like Christ. You’re black? You look like Christ. You struggle to read or do math? You look like Christ. You struggle to speak or walk? You look like Christ. And the list can go on! Do you get it? Jesus says in Matthew 25… when you feed the hungry, care for the sick, and visit the imprisoned, you do this to Christ. Christ’s love and grace makes our differences strengths and our diversity into equality. It’s not an eraser of who we are, but a bold proclamation of what unity through diversity looks like in God’s kingdom and how we are to be with one another. This is what our baptism means! Not only do we put on Christ but we put on Christ’s eyes to how we see every person how God sees them. If we all look like Christ to one another, then how do we treat our neighbor? How do we see Christ in our neighbor?

This is what being one in Christ means and why it’s important as part of our baptismal promises. God’s kingdom is full of promise for us to truly be all who God created us to be-to know that our gifts, or identity, even those things that the world might label as disability or less worthy, are exactly what is needed in God’s kingdom of peace and wholeness. In our baptismal liturgy we shout this reality from Galatians 3 to the world so that all may know that God is doing a new thing through Christ and we get to participate in this work. God is exploding all the boundaries that we erect as humans, so that the truth of worldly labels, division and distinctions no longer grant privilege to some and not to others, and those whom the world has dismissed are now on equal footing with everyone else. It’s not easy, this eradication of boundaries and it will mean for most of us in this space, to set aside our own privilege, power and mindset to look at our neighbors in our communities, schools, workplaces, grocery stores, with the eyes of Christ to see them as Christ too. This is the work of the kingdom.

There is nothing easy about this life of faith. The good news is that Jesus promises to be with us each step, each day, each moment and each breath. Jesus offers us sign posts on the way in the form of water in a font with words of love and grace, a table of abundance where bread and wine are offered for us and for all people-to know that we are gathered as one body through Jesus’ body. Yes, there’s mystery of things we can’t understand, and we don’t have to understand all of it. The mystery of faith through Christ Jesus isn’t a paper to be written or a book to be read, but a life of love, mercy and hope to be lived. Labels, laws, and systems don’t save us. Jesus does. Jesus saves us not because of what we do or don’t do, but because of who and who’s we are: God’s beloved children-one body in diversity and unity, in this love of Christ where there is room for all.

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