A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Jesus the Door Sermon on John 10: 1-10 Easter 4A May 7, 2017 May 10, 2017

 

The gospel text was John 10:1-10 for May 7, 2017. This can be viewed on http://www.bethanylive.org. The sermon is marked in the archived service.

As many of you know, Mike and I had the wonderful opportunity to spend time in Paris last week. It is the first time either of us have been to Europe, although our children have been able to go a few times. The architecture there is stunning with treasures discovered at the turn of every corner. One of the surprises for me (after 28 years together!) was that Mike had a draw towards all the different types of doors that we encountered on the streets, at places such as Notre Dame or Versailles. Many people are drawn to doors and there is much study both psychologically and theologically as to why. Doors, or entry ways, can represent opportunity, protection, change, risk, and excitement. We know that doors have an impact on us, on our brains. How many of you have ever walked into a room to do something and the second you cross the threshold, you forget what that task was? We all do it! There has been research done on this and it turns out that crossing a threshold actually reorients us and transforms us! Going through a door, or entry way, causes our brains to work differently. Going through a door adds possibilities to our brains and therefore pushes whatever we originally considered important, out and allows new input to come in. Doors can broaden our vision, take us to a new place, to new people, to new thoughts.

Today we hear Jesus proclaim: I am the gate. I was struck when I learned that the word “gate” can also mean “door” and it is the same word that is used in John 20 when Jesus walks through the locked doors to the disciples and breathes the Holy Spirit into them. How cool is that! This word gets interpreted as gate here with the context around it of sheep and shepherds but door is most likely a better translation, particularly since we need remember that these ten verses are not a new story.  The beginning of John 10 is actually the end of  the story of the man born blind in John 9 that I happened to preach on March 26, so I don’t know if it’s a Holy Spirit thing that I also have the opportunity to preach on the rest of the story or just bad luck for you all! The first part of John 10 is Jesus still talking to the Pharisees-who were opposing Jesus, the disciples and the man whom he healed. To refresh your memory, there was a man who was born blind and Jesus, with his disciples, came upon him as they were traveling. To be a person with a disability meant that you were an outcast, unclean, sinful somehow and walled off from the community. This man begged for what little people would give him for sheer survival. Jesus healed him, ostensibly returning him to community, full human dignity and worth. But the Pharisees and others, were suspicious of his claim of miraculous healing from Jesus and threw him out of the community. Jesus finds the man again and tells the Pharisees and the disciples that there is more than one way to be blind and sin can separate us from God and blind us from the grace that is freely given to us and we should give to our neighbors.

Our John 10: vs. 1 is simply a continuation of Jesus explaining why God has sent him to dwell among us, why Jesus heals, brings outcasts into community, offers true sight, and true life to all people. Jesus uses all kinds of symbolic speech to broaden our vision of what Jesus came to do: He is living water, bread of life, the light of the world and here, a door. Not a door that excludes, but a door that appears in unexpected places and times, a door that offers hope, and swings wide open to for all to enter. The man born blind, heard the voice of his savior long before he saw him and Jesus spoke words of invitation to him to enter through the door of healing, a door where this man would know that he is a part of the community and love of God, a door that broke through the walls of religious and cultural law to reveal new possibilities, transformation and abundant life. The man had spent his whole life with the understanding that there was no way for him to bridge the wall of his blindness and separation from community. He would have been without much hope for anything different than what he had experienced each day of his life. Until he heard the voice of Jesus coming to him, making a way where before none existed, being a door, an entry way, to a different kind of life that included being transformed in God’s grace for the sake of sharing his encounter with the one who offered him life.

(Children’s sermon) I would like to invite the children to come up: Just like he didn’t leave the man born blind alone and in the dark, Jesus will always find you, call to you and be the door to all that God promises us: God promises that you will have what you need for your life-what do you really need? Yep! Do we really need toys or lots of clothes or the newest scooter? No! There nice to have, but being with God and each other is waaaaay more important than stuff! Jesus will always tell us to be with our family and friends before we worry about stuff-and we can listen for Jesus voice to remind us of that. What are things that we can do to help us to listen for the voice of Jesus? Jesus will call us through the door to be with him and each other! ok, I need you five to link arms tightly and make a wall. Can you do it? No, it’s hard! Now you are going to be Jesus and go delink their arms and make a doorway for the other children. Now make a doorway over here….Jesus does this for us! Jesus makes a path or a way for us when it seems that there isn’t one or it seems impossible. Through Jesus, we are brought into a community of love, life and hope. All that we need to know that we are loved and we need to share love! We’re going to talk a little more about that, so you can go back your families, Thank you for helping!

How do we know it’s the voice of Jesus calling us to walk through his door to abundant life? How do we know it’s not really the thieves or bandits Jesus warns us about? Throughout the bible, God’s story of love for us, we read that abundant life with God is all about relationship with God first and foremost. When we are in relationship with God, we recognize God’s presence, God setting the feast before us, even when enemies of disease, isolation, and fear are present. The door of peace and comfort is opened by God for us. Abundant life with God brings us into relationship with other people as well. In Acts, the community the Apostles and early followers of Jesus, called The Way, was hallmarked by worshipping together, continuing to learn about the promises of God for them and all people, breaking bread together and praying. Abundant life was not about possessions but about a life oriented on God and neighbor. Jesus as the door, ushered them into a new room, a new way of living that changed their hearts, souls and minds and caught the attention of thousands of new people day by day.

Jesus is indeed a door that to a new way of living, being and doing. Jesus calls to us over and over to walk through the door, even when it seems difficult or impossible because the thieves and bandits of the world will try and tell you that there is a wall, a divide that you just can’t cross, that you need to stay in your place or you’re not good enough to enter. Or the thieves and bandits will tell you that it’s all about you, your needs and to stay on this side of the wall where you are lured by false sense of control, need for more and more stuff, or prestige. Jesus’ voice will cut through that noise to call us to the door of himself that gathers us, loves us and transforms us in the truth that we are enough, have enough and are the beloved community. Whatever we had thought was important regarding our lives before we crossed the threshold to Jesus, is reoriented to what God proclaims is important: Loving God with our whole, entire being and our neighbor. Living in the truth that we are all God’s beloved people. We aren’t to keep this abundant life to ourselves but reveal it to people all around us.  This week look at doors in a new light. Every time you go through a door, remember that Jesus is gathering you into his arms and look for who is on the other side of the door with whom you can share the promise of that good news. We proclaim with our voices and our bodies that Jesus is here, breaking through walls that separate us from God and one another. Walls of bias, walls of fear, walls of hopelessness, walls of grief, walls of brokenness that Jesus transforms into a door that swing open wide for entry to the love for God’s diverse people, a door of joy for the promises of God that are freely given to everyone, a door of wholeness in authentic, messy community, a door of grace that proclaims that abundant life isn’t for some but for all. Jesus calls you and me and us all by name through that door. Thanks be to God!

 

 

 

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I gave up Facebook for a week and lived to tell about it October 15, 2016

About two three weeks ago, I took a sabbatical from media, mostly internet media to be honest. I had been facilitating a book club on Wednesday evenings at the church I serve as pastor in Denver, CO, Bethany Lutheran on Jen Hatmaker’s book, “7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess.” Hatmaker identifies seven areas of her comfortable first world life (clothing, possessions, food, stress, waste, media, and spending) and annihilates the down to nothing. Eating only seven foods for a month, getting rid of seven possessions a day for a month (this one goes waaaaaay beyond the seven a day), praying seven times a day, well you get the idea. What happens to your faith and spiritual life when you no longer worry about what to wear? Or what to eat? Or have more money to actually give more than 10%? How can we create less room for our egos and more room for Jesus? The book is not perfect and our group vacillated between devastating recognition of our consumptive, hoarding, selfish, egoist ways of living and the absurdity of how far she takes the experiment, mostly in the name of a book deal. Well, that might be a bit harsh, but sometimes it’s the question that popped up for us.

So we decided about week two into our six week book study that the last week together we would each choose one of the seven areas to mutiny against. I know that I have a Facebook problem, so I chose media. I immediately wondered what in the hell was I thinking??? Give up political rants, what people are eating for dinner and voyeuristic peeks into other people’s lives that are apparently waaaaay more fab than my own? Ok, I’m in. I also gave up tv this week as well. And email and text was only for work purposes, following Hatmaker’s guidelines in the book.

So on Wednesday evening, I posted the obligatory “Hey, as if any of you care, but I won’t be on FB, email or much media for week because blah, blah, blah…” I then turned off all With notifications on twitter, FB, Instagram and Pintrest (Oh my God do I LOVE Pintrest!!!) and took all the apps off my phone. Then I went to bed, convinced I had just severed all connections with human life.

The first couple of days went very smooth and honestly, I didn’t miss it much. With the apps off my phone, the battery lasted FOREVER and I didn’t constantly have notifications coming through distracting me from whatever it was I was doing. Now, I would love to say that I was more productive off of social media, but I’m not sure that is true and I can’t really measure that in a couple of days. I can say, no tv however, meant that read more in the evenings, and went to bed earlier. These are two very good things for this middle aged, tired, brain starting to turn to mush, momma. Unlike Hatmaker, whose children are younger, I have a 17 almost 18 year old son still in the home. So I have to admit that the tv was on-just to the stuff he was watching which mostly doesn’t interest me. My big vice is tv in the morning as I get dressed for work. The Today show is my “stories.” I like to think I’m watching “the news” but….yeah, I know. It’s like saying The Office is a real documentary. (Ahem-If you are a colleague reading this or my lead pastor, kindly skip down to the next paragraph. This next bit doesn’t concern you, at all…) With no tv in the morning, I found that I was generally about 10 minutes faster getting ready for work and to work a bit earlier. And I was less rushed and prepared a better lunch/dinner for later in the day at work.

So, all in all it was going pretty well until…Monday….dun, dun dunnnnn. What happened Monday you ask? Well, this little thing of a conference call Birthing Cross + Gen Eduworship started in Estes Park. As a pastor of Faith Formation and someone who has worked in the faith formation arena in the ELCA for about 15 years and was part of the Killing Sunday School Birthing Cross Gen think tank in 2012, and had presented at the 2014 conference and knew about 80% of the people at this conference (these are MY PEOPLE!) it took the conference being in session for about 30 minutes before emails rolled in (I was at work ya’ll so yes, I was checking email.) pinging me on FB and Twitter for questions, insights, and shout outs. Oh No. I was like a deer in headlights! What do I do?? Is this work? Is this connectivity? Is this ego?? (Um yes, BTW.) I came home that evening and looked at Mike (my spouse of 22 years who seriously is a saint with all of the crazy crap I come up with) and said, “Now what?” He looked at me with patience, love and exasperation and said, “oh for goodness sake just answer them! The world will not end because you tweeted or posted!” So I did. With guilt. With pleasure. With relief.

I did not go on any social media other than that however. I did not scroll, search, or “like.” I don’t think anyway. It’s been three weeks now. But I held the fast in the other areas.

Ok, nitty, gritty, what I learned:

1) I love social media! Not for controversy, not for voyeurism, but because I love reading what other people think, do, give, wonder, and yes, even get upset about.

2) I realized that I use social media for ministry much more than I would have pegged going into the experiment. Pintrest, ya’ll. Pintrest.

3) I genuinely missed you all. Yes, you.

4) I love baby pictures. All of you youngsters keep having babies and putting their gorgeous pictures and videos into my feed please. It keeps me from being too annoyed with my young adult children.

5)The TV can probably just go. Seriously, with the exception of Portlandia, nothin’.

6) This connectivity thing is tricky and messy. It can consume you and it can be an idol like anything else, but it also reminds us that the world is flat. What happens in Syria impacts me, or should. I can know that a friend needs a prayer, yes, an electronic prayer from half way around the country or down the street. We are called into community and social media broadens what that community looks like and how it’s shaped. After a week off, I will with gusto proclaim that social media is not evil! I think, no, I know, it’s where Jesus is. I see Jesus at work in your lives as you work out trying to take kids on fabulous vacations. Not to flaunt wealth, but to make memories from a time that flies by all to quickly. I see Jesus at work as we share ministry, faith, foibles, missteps, prayer, laughter, tears, sorrows, joys and love together even though we’re apart. I see Jesus even in the political rants as I remember to breath, love, and know that God’s kingdom is bigger than our partisanship and divisions.

7) I learned that I learn from all of you. Each and every day. I need other voices to keep from being stuck in my own voice in my head.

8) Because of number 7 above, I learned gratitude for all of you who I read, interact with and learn from. Thank you.

I’m aware that none of these revelations and learnings are earth shattering or “book deal” worthy, but they are mine. I encourage you to try this! What do you learn about yourself and your consumption of media?

May you see the love of Jesus every where you go: In others, in media, in situations, at work, in prayer, at church, and in you.

 

Always Worth It, Sermon on Luke 14: 25-33 July 1, 2016

*This sermon can be viewed on the archives of http://www.bethanylive.org June 29, 2016
This text is hard. I read numerous commentaries, some said God is the king, or the tower builder, or some wrote that Jesus is talking about transforming families, Jesus is saying that you have to give up all your possessions, you have to suffer to be a disciple, on and on. I read and reread those and none of that resonated and didn’t even make that much sense to me. I tried looking at this parable from a Lutheran lens, where’s God active? Where’s God’s grace named? Mmmm not obvious… I tried looking at it from what we know about the gospel of Luke: community matters, social justice matters, caring for the poor and marginalized matters. I got bumpkis. Parables are often hyperbolic and metaphorical. Ok….nope, doesn’t really work with this either. Here’s the deal: This parable is hard because sometimes, life and following Jesus is hard. This parable doesn’t really make much sense because sometimes, life and following Jesus doesn’t make much sense. This parable makes us very uncomfortable because sometimes, life and following Jesus is uncomfortable.
This is not a touchy, feely let me give you some free bread and fish Jesus. This is a Jesus who is more akin to what we might recognize from the Old Testament, Jesus seems to be saying that it means something to be God’s people and there are hard things that you may have to do. In our Bible in 90 Days bible study class we just survived reading Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. We read through all of the laws and what God expects out of God’s people-not to make God happy or to appease God’s anger but to make living together as a people a bit more just, fair, and life-giving. Don’t take what doesn’t belong to you, don’t withhold from the foreigner or the widow, don’t harm each other, don’t take up after other gods or idols because they are shiny and easier to deal with. You are a set apart people, so you should probably act like it. If something or someone is in your way, keeping you from not acting like part of the people of God, remove it. Harsh isn’t it? We don’t like that at all. We love our version of God that loves us just the way we are. We love to rest in the idea that we are ok and nothing more is required of us. That is great pop psychology, but not really what being a disciple is all about. We want God to affirm all that we like, all whom we like and for God to operate in the way that makes sense to us. We like to predict what God will do, who God will bless, and who God will correct. We make God into our own image.
You see, those laws, those seemingly harsh, impossible, limiting, offensive, guilt-ridden laws, were not about punishment, exclusion or God’s love and grace having conditions. The law was about God loving us too much to leave us alone and to our own devices. The law was about breaking us open in order for God’s grace to pour into us and through us to the world. God breaks us open to make us whole, whole as a person and as a community. God breaks us open with the law to make room for God and each other in our lives. God’s heart is to be in relationship with us, whom God created. God desires only good for us, not perfection, and that could mean separating from anything or anyone who diminishes our fullness as a child of God. God created us in God’s image and God will continue to work in us, through us and around us to reveal the true us, which is indeed in God’s image.
That sometimes looks like separating from even your family, Jesus says. Family was everything in first century Palestine and it’s even the crux of Levitical law-but Jesus recognizes that those closest to us can also lead us away from God. It might cost you relationships to follow Jesus. Like James and John, the sons of Zebedee, you might have to drop your nets and walk away, leaving your own father standing alone on his boat. It might cost you the understanding of your friends and family as you go a different way.
Sometimes that looks like separating from the life you once knew, Jesus says. It might cost you when you walk away from the life you’ve always known, your own privilege, financial security, and comfortableness. When we drop our nets to follow Jesus, we are picking up the risk and the cost of building the kingdom of God. In the kingdom of God, we build messy, risky relationships with those whom society pushes to the edges but God commands us to love, our neighbors, all of our neighbors: our Muslim neighbors, our LBGTQI neighbors, our black neighbors, our native neighbors, our Asian neighbors, our Jewish neighbors, our Hindu neighbors, our immigrant neighbors. We will lose our privilege, we will lose our comfort, we will lose our status, but we will also lose our prejudice, and we will lose our ego. You will lose everything that you know today. It will be hard and there is a cost.
There is a cost. Can you afford it? Will you afford it? Can you afford not to? Can we as a people of God afford to stay in our bubble of what we know, of the world telling us that we are only as important as our status, who we hang out with, what we own and where we live? Can we afford to continue to wage war on those who differ from us, who scare us and whom we want to exclude from God’s kingdom? What is it costing us? Jesus says it’s costing us our very lives.
We were not created to own stuff, to wage war, for unhealthy relationships, or for death. God created us for life. God created us to reveal God’s Shalom, which is wholeness, grace, and love. The way of Shalom is not the way of the world. The world levies taxes on us that we will never be able to repay. There will never be enough to satisfy the bill of ego, material possessions, and status. But in God’s kingdom, there is not only enough, but we are enough, not because of what we say or do, but because of who God is, and what God promises: the promise to be with us always, the promise to fill us with the Holy Spirit that is always making us new and transforming our lives, our relationships and all of creation. We are enough for God to work with and we are worth the cost for God. God so wants us to know abundant life, love and grace that God risked great cost in Jesus. Jesus came to proclaim that love poured into us is always worth the cost-even his own life. This love transcends any separation from God and Jesus promises that this love is everything that we need and is free to us.
We are called to reflect and be this love from Jesus. But Jesus knows and affirms that for us, love that is not about self, is hard. Love that pulls you out of your own needs and wants is risky. Love that moves us to change our behaviors so that our neighbor knows this same love is costly. But when we connect with that love of God for the sake of following Jesus out into the world for the sake of our neighbor, it’s always, always worth it, not matter what the cost. Amen.