A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Our Bodies Remember Sermon on Luke 22 October 30, 2020

This sermon was preached on Nov. 1, 2020 at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Holladay, UT. It can be viewed on our YouTube channel Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church SLC.

We are in our generosity focus and celebration of our 60th anniversary. “Rooted in our past, embracing our future.” This week’s theme is “Remember.” We also celebrate All Saints Sunday.

Texts:
Exodus: 16:1-18
Luke 22: 1-23

There have been significant insights gained in the past couple of decades on the link between our brains and our bodies. Most of this information is simply an affirmation of our lived experiences, with the science of hormonal and immune system responses, as well as the activity of our sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. We all know that stress, good and bad, plays a role in our physical well-being and learning how to teach our brains to listen to our bodies is necessary for overall health. Our bodies know a lot, it turns out, perhaps more than our brains but we rarely listen to our bodies until it’s too late. So often in my life, I worked tirelessly on a big paper, project or event only to fall ill immediately following the culmination of that stressor. Our bodies know, and our bodies also remember. Our bodies remember stresses, remember feelings, remember betrayal, remember love. You know that pit in your stomach when you remember an action from several years ago of which you are ashamed? Or those butterflies you get when you think about a beloved?  Sometimes our bodies are the only parts of us that do remember significant events and use bodily responses to get our attention. How many times have we not felt well or “off” only to later remember that it was the anniversary of a beloved’s death, or relationship ending, job loss, or health diagnosis? Conversely, how often have we felt great and then realized it was because we were remembering a time when we were safe, loved and cared for? Our bodies know, and they remember.

We celebrate our 60th anniversary this year at OSLC,  and we gratefully remember the people who had the vision of a community of followers of Jesus in Salt Lake City. Nearly all these people have gone before us, I believe Janice Orme is the only charter member still with us. And while we may not remember all the names, all the faces, we remember the love and faith that they poured into this congregation and this community. We remember, not just with our brains, and hearts, but our bodies. Some of us with the pit of grief in our stomach and some of us breathing easier that these saints had such an astute sense of God’s mission and vision 60 years ago. We know that where we are today, is not by our own doing but due to the love and vision of others and their bodies. This is true in every aspect of our lives. I’m wearing a stole today that celebrates the 50th anniversary of ordination in the Lutheran church of white women, 40th of Black women and 10th of people who are LBGTQIA+. I’m here as a pastor today not because of my own vision, but because of others. The names on this stole are some the faithful women in the Bible who held fast to God’s call and vision and not what the world’s vision for them was because their bodies were female. I remember that they sacrificed much, some their very bodies, for God’s vision and call. Our bodies know and our bodies remember; our bodies know that we are part of a larger whole and remember that we cannot be whole without being together. Our vision, our faith, our calls, bring us into wholeness, and interconnection like puzzle pieces, to God, and perhaps more importantly, with each other.

Jesus exemplifies this truth in his earthly life and death. Jesus points to the power of what our bodies know and remember throughout his ministry. Jesus desires for his disciples, and us, to trust that power of what our bodies know and remember. Our bodies are part the very kingdom of God, they matter and are declared very good. Jesus wants us to watch and listen to his body so that we learn to listen to our own and others. Jesus knew that the time after his death and resurrection for the disciples would be challenging. Their bodies would also be on the line. This faith in following Jesus is not intellectual, it’s incarnational, it’s fleshy, it real and it’s risky. Jesus offered his own body for the work of God to bring eternal life and wholeness for all bodies. Jesus knows that our bodies will need sustenance for this work. So, Jesus, at that last meal with his disciples, gives bread, saying this is my body. It’s broken, it’s divided, it’s sustaining and it’s for you. Eat it, be filled, be reconnected to the body that matters, the body of Christ, to remember. And then drink, for you don’t live by bread alone, drink and know that this is my blood coursing through your veins, through your body. It’s love that runs through you, remember, be reconnected with hope, mercy and forgiveness and then fill others. Your body knows, and your body will remember.

This is why we celebrate the meal, to listen to Jesus’ body and to hear our own. Our bodies know what it is to be loved, to be valued, to be cherished. Our bodies remember every time they are violated. Jesus wants our bodies to only know love, to only remember wholeness, to only remember what it feels like to be in this body of Christ that has no end, that sustains, visions, frees, and hopes. This remembering that Jesus offers in this supper, this reconnection, gives us strength as we go out into the world.

We remember and give thanks on this All Saints Sunday, that we are never alone, we are connected and cared for by the people who have come before us, surround us and are yet to come. We are heard and filled by Jesus’ body, not for our own sake but for people who will come after us, in the next 60 years. People who will be very different, worship differently, live differently, dress differently but who’s bodies are loved all the same by Jesus. Their bodies will know and remember that they were thought of and loved by us today.

Our bodies know and our bodies remember. We remember that we are loved by God, and we are God’s love in the world. Amen.

 

I gave up Facebook for a week and lived to tell about it October 15, 2016

About two three weeks ago, I took a sabbatical from media, mostly internet media to be honest. I had been facilitating a book club on Wednesday evenings at the church I serve as pastor in Denver, CO, Bethany Lutheran on Jen Hatmaker’s book, “7: An Experimental Mutiny Against Excess.” Hatmaker identifies seven areas of her comfortable first world life (clothing, possessions, food, stress, waste, media, and spending) and annihilates the down to nothing. Eating only seven foods for a month, getting rid of seven possessions a day for a month (this one goes waaaaaay beyond the seven a day), praying seven times a day, well you get the idea. What happens to your faith and spiritual life when you no longer worry about what to wear? Or what to eat? Or have more money to actually give more than 10%? How can we create less room for our egos and more room for Jesus? The book is not perfect and our group vacillated between devastating recognition of our consumptive, hoarding, selfish, egoist ways of living and the absurdity of how far she takes the experiment, mostly in the name of a book deal. Well, that might be a bit harsh, but sometimes it’s the question that popped up for us.

So we decided about week two into our six week book study that the last week together we would each choose one of the seven areas to mutiny against. I know that I have a Facebook problem, so I chose media. I immediately wondered what in the hell was I thinking??? Give up political rants, what people are eating for dinner and voyeuristic peeks into other people’s lives that are apparently waaaaay more fab than my own? Ok, I’m in. I also gave up tv this week as well. And email and text was only for work purposes, following Hatmaker’s guidelines in the book.

So on Wednesday evening, I posted the obligatory “Hey, as if any of you care, but I won’t be on FB, email or much media for week because blah, blah, blah…” I then turned off all With notifications on twitter, FB, Instagram and Pintrest (Oh my God do I LOVE Pintrest!!!) and took all the apps off my phone. Then I went to bed, convinced I had just severed all connections with human life.

The first couple of days went very smooth and honestly, I didn’t miss it much. With the apps off my phone, the battery lasted FOREVER and I didn’t constantly have notifications coming through distracting me from whatever it was I was doing. Now, I would love to say that I was more productive off of social media, but I’m not sure that is true and I can’t really measure that in a couple of days. I can say, no tv however, meant that read more in the evenings, and went to bed earlier. These are two very good things for this middle aged, tired, brain starting to turn to mush, momma. Unlike Hatmaker, whose children are younger, I have a 17 almost 18 year old son still in the home. So I have to admit that the tv was on-just to the stuff he was watching which mostly doesn’t interest me. My big vice is tv in the morning as I get dressed for work. The Today show is my “stories.” I like to think I’m watching “the news” but….yeah, I know. It’s like saying The Office is a real documentary. (Ahem-If you are a colleague reading this or my lead pastor, kindly skip down to the next paragraph. This next bit doesn’t concern you, at all…) With no tv in the morning, I found that I was generally about 10 minutes faster getting ready for work and to work a bit earlier. And I was less rushed and prepared a better lunch/dinner for later in the day at work.

So, all in all it was going pretty well until…Monday….dun, dun dunnnnn. What happened Monday you ask? Well, this little thing of a conference call Birthing Cross + Gen Eduworship started in Estes Park. As a pastor of Faith Formation and someone who has worked in the faith formation arena in the ELCA for about 15 years and was part of the Killing Sunday School Birthing Cross Gen think tank in 2012, and had presented at the 2014 conference and knew about 80% of the people at this conference (these are MY PEOPLE!) it took the conference being in session for about 30 minutes before emails rolled in (I was at work ya’ll so yes, I was checking email.) pinging me on FB and Twitter for questions, insights, and shout outs. Oh No. I was like a deer in headlights! What do I do?? Is this work? Is this connectivity? Is this ego?? (Um yes, BTW.) I came home that evening and looked at Mike (my spouse of 22 years who seriously is a saint with all of the crazy crap I come up with) and said, “Now what?” He looked at me with patience, love and exasperation and said, “oh for goodness sake just answer them! The world will not end because you tweeted or posted!” So I did. With guilt. With pleasure. With relief.

I did not go on any social media other than that however. I did not scroll, search, or “like.” I don’t think anyway. It’s been three weeks now. But I held the fast in the other areas.

Ok, nitty, gritty, what I learned:

1) I love social media! Not for controversy, not for voyeurism, but because I love reading what other people think, do, give, wonder, and yes, even get upset about.

2) I realized that I use social media for ministry much more than I would have pegged going into the experiment. Pintrest, ya’ll. Pintrest.

3) I genuinely missed you all. Yes, you.

4) I love baby pictures. All of you youngsters keep having babies and putting their gorgeous pictures and videos into my feed please. It keeps me from being too annoyed with my young adult children.

5)The TV can probably just go. Seriously, with the exception of Portlandia, nothin’.

6) This connectivity thing is tricky and messy. It can consume you and it can be an idol like anything else, but it also reminds us that the world is flat. What happens in Syria impacts me, or should. I can know that a friend needs a prayer, yes, an electronic prayer from half way around the country or down the street. We are called into community and social media broadens what that community looks like and how it’s shaped. After a week off, I will with gusto proclaim that social media is not evil! I think, no, I know, it’s where Jesus is. I see Jesus at work in your lives as you work out trying to take kids on fabulous vacations. Not to flaunt wealth, but to make memories from a time that flies by all to quickly. I see Jesus at work as we share ministry, faith, foibles, missteps, prayer, laughter, tears, sorrows, joys and love together even though we’re apart. I see Jesus even in the political rants as I remember to breath, love, and know that God’s kingdom is bigger than our partisanship and divisions.

7) I learned that I learn from all of you. Each and every day. I need other voices to keep from being stuck in my own voice in my head.

8) Because of number 7 above, I learned gratitude for all of you who I read, interact with and learn from. Thank you.

I’m aware that none of these revelations and learnings are earth shattering or “book deal” worthy, but they are mine. I encourage you to try this! What do you learn about yourself and your consumption of media?

May you see the love of Jesus every where you go: In others, in media, in situations, at work, in prayer, at church, and in you.