A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Renewed by Love-Saints Build for the Future Sermon for All Saints Day Year C November 3, 2019

This sermon was preached at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Holladay, Utah on Nov. 3, 2019.

The texts were:

Psalm 49
Ephesians 1: 11-23
Luke 6: 20-31

Children’s sermon: I have some rocks here, what can we do with them? We can build, decorate, all kinds of things. Have you been hiking and saw rocks stacked up along the trail? Those are called cairns and they are made by people who have walked that way before, realized how difficult it could be and marked the path for people who came after them. These people took time to point others in the right direction so that they could be safe, enjoy the hike and know that they are on the right path. I think that God puts people in our lives that do that same thing, maybe not with rocks, but with their love, power and their whole lives. We call these people saints. They are not perfect people, but they are people who love others so much that they use their time and power to show God’s love to others. Sometimes we think about these saints and they are people who have died, they now live with Jesus, but some are with us each day. Who might be a saint in your life? Today we remember all the saints, particularly those who have died. That can make us sad, and it’s ok to be sad and cry! Tears are holy and are signs of how much we love people. In our story today, Jesus is giving examples of how we need to focus on loving each other and not worrying about what we may have for stuff, or if people like us or not, or if we use our power to only care for ourselves. Jesus says, when we love, we use our power to care for other people. We call this the Golden Rule: “Do to others as you want done to you.” Jesus wants us to know that God loves us and uses God uses power to love us-to keep us safe, to give us family and friends who love us and to hold us when we are sad, hurt and need help. In the bible, rocks are important ways to show God’s love and power to people who come later. Just like on hiking trails people stack rocks, Jacob stacked rocks at the Jordan river so that people in the future would remember God’s care of the Israelites, and the rock that was removed from Jesus’ tomb tells all people of all time of God’s love and power in Jesus resurrection. I have rocks here for us to write the name or initials of some saint in your life who shows you God’s love and power today and for the future. Let’s pray:

I come from a long line of strong women. I have been blessed by grandmothers and great grandmothers who were a force to be reckoned with in their own way. They each have given me a gift that is still with me today. My maternal grandma, Grandma Fouts, was a woman of deep faith. Going to church, Sunday school, youth group, bible studies were not optional, even when we were only visiting for only a week. Her denomination was not Lutheran, it was Church of God, but her commitment to passing on the faith, to ensuring that her grandchildren knew God’s love and power in their lives was always present.  She wanted faith in God built in my life. My grandma Emmons-paternal grandmother-was not deeply religious, but only wanted her grandchildren to know that she was a safe person for all kinds of conversations and challenges. She never judged or offered pedantic advice, but she asked good thought provoking and reflective questions-to build our critical thinking skills. My great grandmas were also both women who had vision beyond themselves. My sweet great grandma Tone from Norway, (we called her Gung) who was about four foot ten inches, would feed you, sing Lutheran hymns to you, care for you and make you feel special and at the same time, we knew who was in charge. Her. To say she was feisty is an understatement, but we all knew that for her, building family was important. My great grandmother Emmons, again paternal, was the original feminist. She wrote several books and plays and was one of the first authors to write about an important moment in history strictly from a feminist perspective: The Lewis and Clark expedition. Her book was that expedition from Sacajawea’s point of view.  When I was a little girl, and we would go visit her, she would whisper in my ear, remember, “you’re smarter and better than the boys, don’t forget it!” She was building a better future for all women but particularly her daughter, granddaughters and great granddaughters. What I learned most from these four women was not to get stuck in what was happening today, my actions were not about me only and pointing people in the right direction and building someone up for their future matters. They exemplified using their own power-no matter how limited that might have been with age, gender roles, etc.-to show God’s love to their family. They innately understood that power was to be given away, that love isn’t a sentimental emotion but actions of tenacity, courage, justice and building to make the world better for those who came after them. They weren’t perfect, but they are saints, set apart for God’s work of love. I am connected to them as their descendant and I build on their lives to offer actions of love to others in my life for today and for tomorrow.

We tend to think of saints as people who are somehow infallible. But in our scripture passages today, we get a different glimpse of the kind of saints that God calls us to be. If we take a deeper look at saints, we discover that they are not always comfortable people to be around. They are those who aren’t important by the world’s standards, they are on the edges of “respectability,” and status, we might even call them trouble makers because their actions reveal the power and control in our society run amok. Saints often point to life in the here and now while building something beyond that for the future.

Jesus says, blessed are those who are poor, hungry, mourning, excluded, reviled and defamed, not to say those are the only saints, but Jesus is pointing out that in God’s kingdom and economy, they are equal to those who seem to have everything by worldly standards. In Jesus day, the poor, hungry, grieving, outcasts, were to be avoided. Whenever we avoid someone, look down on them, we are using our power for ourselves and our comforts. No wonder Jesus then says “woe” which means “yikes” or “look out!” Look out if you are rich, satiated, laughing, and beloved by everyone (is that even a thing?) because you’ve built a world all about you in the here and now. You’ve placed your trust in yourself and things that are fleeting and what we don’t have control over in this life. If you have power, privilege and material wealth, fine, but look out for what you are actually building.

Saints point to the truth that whether we are poor or rich, hungry or full, laughing or grieving, part of the “in-crowd” or not, that God, through Jesus Christ, shares power and love with us. This is the promise. Our response is to treat everyone with this same power and love from God and build them up. When someone tries to exert their power over us, curses us, mocks us, takes our things without permission, disrespects us, we don’t respond to power with power, we respond with powerful love-not the emotion but the actions. To be clear, being abused is not ok, and is not to be glorified in anyway. Loving actions also look like clear and firm boundaries. Boundaries in many ways are like turning the other cheek. It’s calling out abusive words and actions. As saints, we reveal God’s reversal of powers in the world, that Jesus’ ministry and mission points to building up people and building up the kingdom of God for today and for tomorrow. It’s love that shows what God is building. This love can’t be lost, swept under the rug or denied. God’s love and power through Jesus is about transforming the world from the bottom up, the inside out, from today to tomorrow and from death to life. God’s love renews us when we think that we can’t keep going, when we’ve messed up, it’s hard and we are uncertain. God’s love pulls us to see beyond ourselves and the systems in which we are caught, to the vision that God’s inclusive love changes us and changes the world.

We are building, oh saints of God. We are building here at OSLC not only for us today, but for those who will come after us. We will use our power and love we have from God to build in unlikely places with unlikely people-we will build a community of radical inclusion where all are safe, we will build a community that bridges partisanship,  we will build a community that values civil dialogue and collaboration with all our neighbors regardless of differences, we will build a community where we get at the roots of hunger, poverty and homelessness for all people to thrive. This will not make us popular, but God will be present. We will not do this perfectly, but we will build with God as saints for those who come after us. We will point to the importance of Jesus Christ, and the empty tomb-God’s loving actions for creation and we will point to the power of God to transform, renew and love us all today and tomorrow. Thanks be to God.