A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Talking the Jesus Talk and Walking the Jesus Walk: Sermon on Mark 8 September 13, 2021

This sermon was proclaimed in the community of Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Holladay, UT on Sept. 12, 2021. It can be viewed on our YouTube Channel: Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church SLC. The texts were:

Isaiah 50: 4-9a
Psalm 166: 1-9
Mark 8: 27-38

Young Friends message:

Ok I’m going to have you call out some actions for me to do and I’ll do them! (But when they call out for instance jumping, I’ll snap my fingers instead, or if they say clap, I’ll jump.) They will probably get frustrated with me. So we’ll try again. This time I’ll do what they call out correctly. Ask: Does something like this ever happen in your life where someone will say one thing and do something else? Or misunderstand what you mean? Yes! It happens all the time! Sometimes, it’s not a big deal like our fun just now, but sometimes it matters that what we say and what we do match. We call that “talking the talk and walking the walk.” When we say we’ll do something, we’ll actually do it. Such as when you say to your parents that you’ll be kind to your friends or siblings but then you might not share or use kind words with them. Our Bible story reminds me of this today. Jesus is teaching his disciples and he asks them who people say he is, and they give him a bunch of responses but none are who he really is. But then Peter says: You are the Messiah! Which means Jesus is the anointed one of God. Jesus then does a curious thing and tells them not to tell anyone that. But then tells the disciples some hard things about being a messiah, that he will be hurt and killed, which is not what they think being a messiah is about. The word messiah for them is like being powerful king, and kings are considered special aren’t they? They live in a big castle away from other people, they are served by people, and don’t usually work the way other people do. But Jesus says that is not who he is. He is someone who is just like us in many ways, except he talks and walk in the love of God for us all to see. Even if it gets him hurt. Peter tells Jesus to stop talking that way, because Peter wants Jesus to be the special king who is separate. But Jesus says no, Peter, stop thinking I’m special because I’m separate from you, I’m special because I’m with you and you will be with me. Jesus is talking the talk and walking the walk of loving us. We’re going to talk and hopefully walk, more about this power of words and actions matching.

I can remember when I was a little girl and my mom would be eating a treat or drinking her diet coke and I would want to do the same. She would tell me, “do as I say and not as I do.” That phrase was well intentioned enough as she didn’t want me eating sugar or drinking soda at all. As a parent there were plenty of times I did or said something that I wouldn’t want my children to do or say. I remember clearly the first time Kayla said a swear word, in the church nursery, to the associate pastor’s child. Sigh. She was only doing and saying what she had witnessed me doing and saying. Kayla, at the age of four, didn’t understand the difference between me doing those things and her doing those things. I felt terrible, guilty, and maybe a bit ashamed, that what I wanted to do and say but what I actually did and said was on display in the form of my daughter. Not my finest parenting moment but not my worst either. I was after all someone trained in teaching children, I talked all the time about boundaries, language development, discipline techniques, all of it. And parents at the church would come to me with parenting challenges and questions. And then here is my own child behaving in a way that didn’t seem congruent with a parent who had knowledge and experience in child development and had children of their own. I needed to remember that my talk and walk were not only about myself, but about everyone around me.

 I admire people who truly talk the talk and walk the walk. I think of the obvious, Jesus, the early martyrs of fledging Christianity, Joan of Arc, Martin Luther as historical figures, but even more contemporary such as Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi, Mother Theresa, John Lewis, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglas, and the list can go on. And we all know people who quietly and without much notoriety live in such a way that their words and actions are held together to create a holistic life. They can cut through all of the talk of the world that is about self, scarcity, fear and power and hear the talk of community, abundance and connection. Not only that, but they can talk that talk and then walk in that truth. They take the path that might label them as weird or a troublemaker for not talking and walking the way the world demands. They talk and walk they way they do for others to be freed from the lies and paths of deception. Their talk and walk are not for themselves.

Peter was only considering his own talk and walk when he pulled Jesus aside and told him to stop the downer talk. Suffer and die? Take up a cross, a sign not only of death and torture, but of ridicule and criminality? What? It would be akin to Jesus telling us today to purposely go to death row at prison and sit in the electric chair. This wasn’t the word or the action that Peter, any of the disciples, or if we’re honest, any of us want to hear from Jesus either. Peter wanted Jesus to talk about how he and his followers were special, different from everyone else and would be treated as such. Jesus realized that Peter wanted to say and do what helped Peter, but ultimately, deceived Peter. Peter was confused about divine things and human things. Peter needed to lose his own talk and walk and pick up Jesus’ talk and walk.

Jesus is clear about what he says and does. Jesus gives us straight talk that his walk is one that focuses on community, truth and creating the kingdom of God.  Jesus’ talk comforts the outcast with words of inclusion and hope. Jesus’ talk empowers women and children with identity and worth.  Jesus’ talk blesses the poor, the meek, the hungry, the thirsty, the lonely. Jesus’ talk calls out misuse of power from leaders, every time. Jesus’ walk touches the unclean, and the dead. Jesus’ walk crosses into territories where he is a stranger. Jesus’ walk flips rules, and tables of social order, upside down. Jesus’ walks to the cross to die to reveal the truth of the violence of the world and truth of God’s love for the world, no matter what.

As followers of Jesus, this is also the talk we talk and the walk we walk. Who we say Jesus is needs to be matched by our actions.  This is our baptismal call, this is the cross that we carry, the full weight of losing our own talk and walk for Jesus’ talk and walk. We can’t be silent or paralyzed. Our Jesus’ talk speaks life into a world that loves to rally around death and fear. We talk the Jesus’ talk that pregnant people have rights over their own bodies, healthcare and lives. We walk the Jesus’ walk of welcoming the children of all ages with this playground and Little Library. We walk the Jesus walk of ensuring healthcare, housing, equal pay and support for all people. We talk the Jesus talk of ending the unnecessary daily deaths of thousands from a disease that is being used to divide and conquer us. COVID19 yes, but the disease I’m talking about is the lie of individualism and consumerism that drives our societal policies and culture. We talk the Jesus talk to flip the tables on racism and classism to make room for unheard voices. We walk the Jesus walk with our refugee and immigrant cousins to safety, freedom and a future. We walk the Jesus walk in caring for creation and walking in humility with nature. We talk the Jesus talk, we walk the Jesus walk, and not our own. We lose ourselves and gain the truth, gain peace, gain the abundant life of our neighbor and creation. We gain oneness with God and each other.

Jesus’ talk and walk is for you, for me, and for us all. Jesus’ talk and walk goes before us, beside us and guides us each day. Amen.