A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Quality of Life Sermon on Matthew 22 October 9, 2020

This sermon was preached on October 11, 2020 at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Holladay, UT. It can be viewed on our YouTube channel Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church SLC.

The texts were:
Psalm 23
Philippians 4: 1-10
Matthew 22: 1-14

One of the goals of parenting, caregiving, teaching or mentoring, is to help another person achieve a healthy, vibrant and sustainable life-to have what we often refer to as “quality of life.”  Such as when my children were very young, I knew that making them take a nap would ensure a better rest of the day. Now that doesn’t mean that they were always receptive to this nap. Sometimes I had to make them lie down to get them to rest. They thought I was being mean and unfair because they wanted to stay up and do what they wanted to do. But I knew that if they didn’t rest, they would be crabby and melt down later and it wouldn’t be good for them or anyone around them. Their resistance to this reality is not unique as we often can’t see consequences for our choices, for ourselves or those around us. I usually think that I know what I need to have the kind of quality of life I want and deserve. And yet, I have to admit, when I consider my own quality of life, rarely do I consider the impact of my decisions on others.

This idea of our quality of life is front and center right now in our culture. We all have our individual opinions on what is a good quality of life and tend to think that we should have autonomy over those opinions. Where we go, what we do, where we live, what we buy, and what we share. We all want security: financial, health, food, housing, work, etc. And we are sure that we each know the best way to have a good quality of life. The crisis comes when others don’t agree with us and when our decisions for ourselves impact one another in negative ways.

Jesus challenges our concept of “quality of life” in our parable today. This is a hard parable, and I seriously considered preaching on one of the other two texts, except I realized Psalm 23 and Philippians 4 only support what Jesus is saying in Matthew 22. This parable is filled with invitation, rejection, killing of the messengers, destruction of the city, the good and the bad gathered off the streets and ultimately someone thrown out of the wedding banquet. Not a lot of good news it seems, as reality abounds in this parable.

Jesus says the kingdom of heaven is like a king who gave a wedding feast for his son. Wedding feasts were about unity, the combining of clans, cementing of relationships and alliances. They were political. Attending a wedding feast was a statement about your allegiances and how you lived. You didn’t attend a wedding feast lightly or just to make an appearance. In this harsh parable Jesus offers that we must understand that we have been invited to God’s wedding feast. God is offering us a relationship that is important and permanent. All too often, we walk away from the invitation of this relationship because it might seem risky to accept it, to be seen at the feast, or we mistakenly think our daily lives are the real invitation from God. We look for ways to avoid making visible our allegiance to the good news of Jesus in the world. We make light of the importance for showing up, and not just showing up half-heartedly or because we have nothing better to do. God desires for us to show up fully clothed in our baptisms, fully clothed with the love for our neighbor, fully clothed in the understanding that we can’t be speechless, like the guest who didn’t understand that half-way doesn’t cut it. We show up knowing that our quality of life is not something that we decide for ourselves nor is it what we can control and master. No, good quality of life, only comes from our lives in God through Jesus Christ who lived, died and was raised from the dead to usher in quality of life for all to flourish today and forever. Good quality of life requires something from us, it requires that we do the things that may not make sense or seem too hard. Good quality of life means that we recognize that our quality of life is interconnected to the quality of life of each other.

When we show up fully as God’s people, living the message of love for the world through Jesus, in the hardest of situations, that is a good quality of life. Paul, in Philippians, was writing from prison, probably about to be killed and yet, rejoiced in his quality of life in the grace and mercy of Christ that he shared with the people of Philippi. A good quality of life is a life lived for God and for others. It’s not living perfectly, or the absence of hard situations, but it’s the ability to deal with what is, even if what it is, is hard.

 Our presence matters, and not just for appearances. How we live our lives, our actions as the people of God must be clear and plain. Jesus offers that the wedding guest not clothed correctly was thrown out, and I wonder if that is because when our inside intentions don’t match our outside actions, we have the possibility of harming those around us. We can’t talk about loving our neighbor while refusing to wear a mask to keep them safe, or deny them healthcare, or go hungry, or sleep on the streets, or the right to immigrate, or to allow racism to abound. We are called to consider what will further human flourishing, not just our own. God’s invitation is indeed for all and how we respond matters. When I don’t respond fully as a person of God, I not only undermine my own quality of life, but the quality of life of others around me. When I’m silent on matters of injustice, when I avoid hard conversations with a misguided notion of keeping the peace, when I stay in my comfort bubble because my privilege allows me to, when I don’t do the hard actions of putting my money where my mouth is for reparations for Black and indigenous folks, then I lessen the quality of life for others in the world. For Jesus, our quality of life is bound up in one another, as a community, AND our individual response matters as it impacts the community. For Jesus, our quality of life can be rich only through our connection to God and accepting the invitation to God’s love, mercy, grace and forgiveness. Our quality of life is not about us, and yes, when we think it is, difficult, unpleasant and harmful events unfold in our midst, this is the reality of the parable and our lives. Our quality of life is full with promise and hope and when we open our hearts, spirits and souls to life fully with God in God’s kingdom, and we are connected to the joyful feast of life that never ends in Jesus.
You are loved. You are beloved. Go and be love. Amen.

 

We Already Know Sermon on Luke 16: 19-31 September 29, 2019

This sermon was preached on September 29, 2019 at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Holladay, UT.

Texts: Amos 6: 1a, 4-7
1 Timothy 6: 6-19
Luke 16: 19-31

Children’s sermon: gather the children up front. Start with the closing prayer! Dear Jesus, thank you for showing us God’s love and how to love others. May we notice those around us who need what we already have an abundance of your love and grace. Amen.
Then ask them, when do we normally do that prayer in children’s time? At the end! Yes, we always know that we are going to end with a prayer but today we started with the prayer because our bible stories are a little like this today. In reading the Luke story about the rich man and Lazarus, the rich man already had everything he needed-food, housing, clothes, and Lazarus did not have those things. Now, I want to let you know that this story is NOT about what happens when we die, we don’t have to worry about that and Jesus promises that we will never be alone in this life or the next. There is a not a bad place that you need to worry about going to, that’s not what God wants. This story is about the last sentence we read, that we already know Jesus, we already listen to God telling us to love everyone and to make sure that everyone has what they need to be healthy, happy and safe. Just as you already know that we will always end children’s time with a prayer, we already know that God’s last word for all of us is love. And this last word of love means that we already know the whole story, that love and life never end! Just like a circle never ends, being in God’s love and life is like that too. We are all in this circle of love. So, since we don’t have to worry about that-we can stop focusing on ourselves and focus on people around us. We can see people like Lazarus who are sick, hungry and without a house. How do we help people like that here at OSLC? YES! We have Family Promise, we collect food to hand out, we will be collecting diapers, all kinds of ways! Ok, we’ve already prayed and I’m going to talk to the adults some more about this.

We all love a good story and want to know how it will end. Whether it’s movies or books, we can’t wait for the ending to see how it turns out. There is great satisfaction in knowing the whole story. We take this same tactic with our lives too it seems, we are always wondering how things will turn out-what will our whole story be? Will I get that promotion? Will we move into that bigger house? Can we go on that vacation? What will my children be when they grow up? What will we do in retirement? How will my health be as I age? We want to know everything, we want assurances, we want details and, of course, we want control.

This was what the rich man in our parable from Luke today was trying to do. He was trying to ensure that he had what he needed for the future so that he could control and predict the outcome of his life story. Jesus doesn’t say that he’s a bad person, Jesus doesn’t condemn him in anyway. Jesus merely points out that the rich man is so concerned with his own life that he doesn’t notice the lives around him, particularly the man right outside his own gate-Lazarus. While the rich man is dressed nicely, eats well and has safe housing in a gated community, Lazarus languishes nearby hoping for just a modicum of what the rich man has. And then both men die, death is the great equalizer it seems. Although Lazarus is carried away by angels and the rich man is buried. Now as I told the children, the point of this parable is certainly not to say that there is a heaven and a hell as places. Whenever Jesus in the gospels talks about Hades or in Matthew Ghenna-which is the garbage heap that gets burned outside the city, it’s all about being separated from God and community. Hell isn’t a place where bad people go when the die, hell is a place any of us can be in this life when we separate ourselves from God and God’s people. We create our own hell.

We read that there is a great chasm-that God didn’t create, the rich man did. The rich man is so oblivious, blinded by his wealth and excess, that he doesn’t know his own arrogance and entitlement. It never occurs to him that he could bridge or remove that chasm. But instead he barks orders at Father Abraham to have Lazarus do things for him. Even in death, the rich man thinks that he knows more and can control his own predicament and write his own ending. “Have Lazarus give me water, send him to warn my brothers.” The rich man seems to not know that his wealth and status are fleeting, aren’t his whole story, aren’t his to begin with and are a distractor for what is really important. Jesus doesn’t say that his wealth is the problem, it’s how he uses it, or in reality, how the wealth uses him. Money isn’t a problem, loving money, or loving anything more than God or people is a problem and is a root of evil. When we put anything before God and others, we do harm, we separate ourselves and think it’s only about us. We deny others their full story. Jesus came to show us how to reorder our loves. “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength and love your neighbor as yourself.” Just as God has loved us from the beginning, we are to love God and each other all the way to the end.

In response to the rich man’s request to send Lazarus to his brothers, Abraham admonishes him, they know this story, this truth. They have already heard it, over and over again, from Moses to Joshua, from Amos to Isaiah, God’s word of redemption, reconciliation and salvation-wholeness, have been spoken. They know this, but they won’t live it. Will hearing the story one more time from someone who has been resurrected from the dead matter? When they grasp the end, they will change how they live today.

We know the ending of the story, brothers and sisters. We have the witnesses of the resurrection to know that in the end, God’s end, is death is no more, love wins, the chasm is once and for all bridged and God’s kingdom of wholeness is here and is still to be revealed. And we know that God sent Jesus to remove any chasm, nor death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything can now separate us from God’s love and each other. This is not in dispute. This good news is freedom from worrying about ourselves, from our ends, we are free to be content with our here and now. As we read in 1 Timothy, we can take hold of eternal life and our life today-they are one in the same. There is a not a separation between today and eternal life with God. How we live today is as important as our eternal life with God. As followers of Jesus, this is our call, to live in such a way for all to see this eternal love right here and now.

We already know this unity of our lives today and eternal life opens us to see the plight of others around us, their need to be whole. Our present life entwined with the eternal life to come, bridges any chasms that we have created between others and ultimately God. We bridge chasms when we talk to people who are living on the street and holding up signs off of interstates. We bridge chasms when we elicit from our neighbor what they really need and don’t assume and speak for them. We bridge chasms when we recognize that we have enough-enough wealth, power and status-and we share the excess that we have so that all may be content. We bridge chasms when we recognize whatever wealth we have as a resource to be used in God’s kingdom and not as an entitlement or for power. We bridge chasms when we see what our neighborhood around us needs from us-how we can be together-whether it’s Scouting, diapers, food, hosting meetings, or places for children to play.

We already know the whole story, we have already heard the good news, and we have been richly blessed. We already have all that we need to bridge any chasms, to love our neighbor, and be generous, so that all may take hold of true life with God: life and love that we already know doesn’t end. Thanks be to God.

 

Speechless A Sermon on Matthew 22: 1-14 October 21, 2017

This sermon was preached Oct. 15, 2017 at Bethany Lutheran Church Cherry Hills Village, CO. You can watch it live at http://www.bethanylive.org

The texts are Isaiah 25: 1-9, Philippians 4: 1-9 and Matthew 22: 1-14

I have been left speechless more times than I would like lately. Sometimes there are simply no words for what we witness around us in the world. What words are adequate for a beautiful new baby? Or for the miracle a loved one was hoping for? What do we say about fires that rage out of control, killing people, destroying not only property, but also livelihoods. What do we say to loved ones diagnosed with cancer, Alzheimer’s, mental illness or heart disease? What do we say about teens taking their own lives believing that is the only answer despite our pleas to the contrary? What do we say about nations at war and innocent people caught in the crossfire? What do we say when dialog seems to only break down to fundamentalism, blaming and shaming? What do we say? Do our words matter? Do our actions matter?

I resonated with the man in our Matthew parable who was speechless and I  wonder if we misunderstand why he was cast out. Jesus tells a parable about a king who invites people to attend a wedding feast for his son and he is refused by people who fancy themselves too busy with their own lives and priorities to attend. Remembering that the parables that Jesus told were steeped in hyperbole, the king became enraged and burned down the city. That is the king decided to see what would happen if the peoples self-selected priorities and tasks were taken away. What happens when everything that we think is important is gone? What happens when priorities, ideas, tasks that we have built our lives around come crashing down? That can render one speechless and in despair.

Then the kings sent his slaves out again, to gather all they could find, the good, the bad and the ugly to come to this feast that the elite, the self-important and self-absorbed had rejected. The king filled his hall with people who did not refuse for whatever reason, and I don’t believe that these people were more altruistic or truly understood better than the first batch of invitees. No, more than likely, these were people of a social rank who wouldn’t normally be included and so how could they say no? This reminds us that inclusion is a tricky thing: to radically include all people regardless of social status, economic status, race, color, gender, sexual orientation, or any other human made category, means that someone else may exclude themselves so to not be included with “certain people.” The slaves of the king couldn’t help who excluded themselves when the first call came to be part of the feast of abundance and love. And the king understood this on some level as well, and so instead kept inviting and including-gathering all that he could.

Then we come to verse 11 with the unsettling tale of the man not dressed correctly for the wedding feast. Scholars have lots of theories on these verses but all admit it’s notion of judgment is troublesome. When confronted with not being dressed appropriately, the man is silent. He has nothing to say. Perhaps he knows that he should say something, but is worried that his words will be inadequate or will spark controversy. Or will his words fall on deaf ears? Or will his words not match his actions and he will be called a hypocrite? After all of this radical inclusion why now is this man excluded for a seemingly small infraction as failing the dress code? After all, he DID respond to the invitation…isn’t that enough? Is it really just about not having said yes to the dress? Or is it his lack of response that sends him to the outer darkness with weeping and gnashing of teeth?

The last three weeks we have wrestled with the parables of Jesus around what it means to fully participate in the kingdom of God and by who’s authority we are included. As good Lutherans, we focus on the unconditional grace, love and mercy of our loving God through Jesus Christ, and this is good. But Matthew is challenging us to not stop there. Our theology must not end with comfort for ourselves, peace of mind that we are ok, that since we don’t earn God’s grace, we don’t have to do anything. These parables are a corrective for that line of thinking that I know lulls me to complacency far too often. God’s grace for ME, God’s unconditional love for ME, God’s uses of God’s authority for ME. This is most certainly true and it has seismic consequences for how I am then in relationship with other people and how I am called to live. God most certainly uses her authority to include all people: people I don’t like, people I would never associate with, people I fundamentally think are wrong. It’s also clear that for God it matters how we live together. So much so that God sent Jesus to show us how. Jesus gave away his own power and authority to eat with tax collectors, prostitutes, lowly fishermen, and women. Jesus used his authority to bring the children to him. Jesus used his authority speak up for the voiceless. Jesus declared that in the coming of the kingdom, God will use her authority to free the imprisoned, give voice to the oppressed, bring light to the darkness. Jesus stood speechless before Pilate instead of using authority to save himself. Jesus suffered and died on the cross in solidarity with all who suffer and die, revealing the power, strength and authority of God to swallow up death, and as we are reminded today in Isaiah 25, and bring us all through suffering to eternal life. Jesus constantly used his authority for the sake of other people and Paul urged the Philippians and us to keep doing those things that we have learned from Jesus, using the authority of love and grace given to us from Jesus, for the sake of bringing in the peace, shalom, of the kingdom of God.

It might seem easier, like the man without the robe at the banquet, to remain silent when asked how we are included as a child of God and how we or others belong. But remaining silent is not our call-we are called to speak out against injustice, to speak out in solidarity for the oppressed, the weak, the powerless, the voiceless. To not speak is to be in the outer darkness, to be separated from the truth of God’s kingdom. But more than our words, God calls us to action. What we do matters. We wear the robe of Christ, as given to us in our baptism. We sometimes forget that baptism is not only about personal salvation but is a public proclamation for what God has already done through Jesus Christ and that we are co-workers in community with God for the sake of reconciliation, justice and peace for all people-no matter what. God wants us to use the authority that we have through our baptisms, authority that only comes from God, for the furthering of this mission. Colton, you will now have an active role in this mission from God. Your actions matter little man, not because your salvation is at stake but because God’s mission in the world is at stake. People desperately need us to not only open our mouths about God’s love and mercy, but even more desperately need us to boldly use our lives to show them God’s love and mercy.

Our busy lives distract us from our own invitation and from extending the invitation to our neighbor from God to participate in the abundance, joy and rejoicing that is offered to us all. Our busy lives tell us the falsehoods of scarcity, worry, entitlement, status, autonomy, independence and using our authority for our own gain. We lull ourselves into complacency that little ol’ us doesn’t matter. Jesus says different, you matter, because you are a part of something bigger, more abundant, more creative, more than you can ever imagine in the heart and life of God. Your actions do matter: Go to candlelight vigils, speak prayers and sing songs of healing for those who grieve from tragedies, go to a sick loved one’s bedside with tears, prayers and a casserole, go to the Red Cross to donate blood or money for fire or hurricane victims, go to the funeral, or more importantly, go and visit with the grieving several weeks later, go talk to the beggar on the street corner and ask her how she is, go to a memory care unit and listen to stories for the hundredth time with a smile, holding hands and a tear, go and offer compassion and reassurance to youth as they struggle growing up in a world that demands perfection above all else, go and bring Christ with you to the outer darkness, go to where there is weeping and gnashing of teeth in order to point to the light that the darkness cannot and will not overcome.

Yes, sometimes our words may not seem eloquent, or adequate but we are not to be left speechless or powerless in the grace, mercy, love and authority of Jesus Christ. Rejoice in the Lord always, let what we have learned from Jesus be known to people around us; use our words, tasks, lives and authority for healing and uplifting of people on the margins; God’s power and strength surrounds us always with peace that goes beyond the end of conflict and moves us all into the wholeness of the kingdom of God where all are invited, included and loved.