A Lutheran Says What?

Sermons and random thoughts on God, the world and the intersection of the two

Changed by Water: Baptism August 31st, 2016 Romans 6: 3-4 September 8, 2016

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*You can go to http://www.bethany-live.org to watch the worship service.

Have you ever walked in the rain? Being from WA and OR, I have a lot. When you walk in the rain, you see how water changes things. Water makes plants and crops grow, water sustains our lives, water cleans the earth, water cleans us. We also know that water causes things to be destroyed: water erodes rocks, in LA we see how too much water destroys homes, water even causes death to animals and people. The news rarely shows us the good that water does, only the harm. Water is everywhere on earth, even if it’s just small amounts, water is powerful and is a source of death and life, it’s constantly changing the world. We use water in our sacrament of baptism (a sacrament is an action that we do as a community to reveal God’s promise of love and life) and it’s a curious thing isn’t it that we pour water, something that can cause us harm, on babies and young children (sometimes older youth and adults).
We tend to think of baptism as part of God’s promise of something a long way off-when we die from this body and earth and live with God. It’s easy to think of this as not something that affects our daily life-today Wednesday August 31st, 2016. Baptism IS partially about what happens when we die from our earthly bodies-baptism reminds us that we are never separated from God and God will gather us up in God’s arms when we die and offer us resurrection-life with God forever. But baptism is even more than that! The new life that Paul is writing to the church in Rome about is about our lives today, right here, right now. Baptism changes our todays, not just our tomorrows.
Baptism is a public proclamation for what God has done for us and for all people. When we pour water over a baby, child, youth or adult, we are saying to the whole world that God names them as a child of God, claims them forever as belonging to and being in the life of God, and is sent out with the love of Christ to be a part of a Christian community, what we call Church, and into the world reflecting the light of Christ. It’s not that before we poured the water, they weren’t part of God’s promises for life, love and belonging, they were, God has taken care of that, we don’t have to worry about who’s in or out. Baptism is important, though, because it’s not about how we die, but it’s all about how we live, how we are changed by God to share love with the world.
Some of this is about earthly death, but it’s also about how sometimes things have to die in us in order for us to do something new. For those of you who are middle schoolers, right now some of your habits are changing, what’s dying is that you’re no longer a young child, but are a new youth. You’re changing! When you were born, your parents way of living without children died and they took on a new life as your mom and dad. Their life changed. Or when you realize that something you do isn’t helpful to you or people around you, you quit doing that habit, or it dies, and you do a new thing, you change. Baptism declares that God wants us to be new, changed people every day. God says to each of us, “I love you and I want selfishness, hate, and fear to die, to be changed to love, sharing, and joy that will grow in you so that other people can be changed by your drenching them in love, sharing and joy.” And here’s the cool thing: God says that we get to try again to change every day, even if we didn’t do that well the day before!
Water poured over us at baptism washes away, destroys, the messages from the world that tells us to look out for only ourselves, keep all our stuff to ourselves and get more stuff, and to be afraid of not being perfect, of not having enough, of all kinds of stuff. Water not only destroys these messages, but also opens us up like a cavern to be filled with what God wants to grow in us. And not someday, but every day! And we do this together, we live in faith together to ensure that all people in the world know the power of what God offers everyone: belonging, love and hope.
Baptism declares that we are changed from grave people to grace people. We don’t look for death in water like the world does, but life. God’s love poured out on us, brings us to life. When we say we’re grace people, not grave people, it means that we look for life, new life, everywhere. After Jesus died and was buried, the women went to the tomb expecting to see death but instead saw that God had raised Jesus to life! Jesus told the women and later the disciples to not look for death when God’s promise of life is everywhere. The followers of Jesus, men, women, boys and girls, saw this new life clearly in their everyday lives, and we too look for new life in all of the seemingly ordinary places we go.
We look for new life in our friendships at school. I’m sure you have all had the experience of not getting along with a classmate or a friend for a while-grace people look for how to pour out forgiveness to change the relationship. Who has fought with their parents, or brothers or sisters? Yep! We all have! Grace people look for ways to say “I’m sorry” and “I forgive you” in order to pour out a new beginning, new life with those family members. When you think that you’ve messed up beyond a second chance, remember that God says “new life is always here for you. Just as water is everywhere changing what the world looks like, so am I.” There is no where you can go that God won’t be there with the good news that your past mistakes, sorrow and worries die in the promises of God for new life, love forever and joy that grows in us all each day, over and over no matter what to change us and the world. Walk as grace people: wet in new life, drenched in love, and changed by joy. Amen.

 

A Pack of Gum and the Kingdom of God, John 6: 35-51, Pentecost 11B, Aug. 9th, 2015 August 9, 2015

My son Andrew’s love language is gifts. If you know anything about the Five Love Languages Book you’ll know that someone whose love language is gifts, love not only to receive gifts but to give them. It’s more than just a gift exchange at Christmas. If I go to the grocery store and bring back a pack of gum for Andrew, he is as happy as it were Christmas morning and he received everything on his list. He finds joy in the everyday ordinary gifts that might come his way, even second hand gifts. I recently gave him an old netbook and he was as happy as a clam even though it is slow and doesn’t really have a battery life anymore. You see, what Andrew really likes about gifts is that someone is thinking of him. When you offer him a pack of gum you picked up at the grocery store that says to him, “I was thinking about you even though we weren’t together.” For Andrew, the ordinary becomes the extraordinary, this has been a great reminder to me as his parent. He naturally sees the special where I see mess, ordinariness or something to complain about. How many of us would look at a pack of gum and say, “This isn’t a special gift! Isn’t this just some Trident from the impulse buy section by the cash register at King Soopers?” When really we shouldn’t complain because the gift isn’t really the object but the relationship the object implies.
I think we often miss the extraordinary in the ordinary. We look at the world so practically, logically and we attempt to make sense of all of our interaction with each other and even with God, through the lens of ourselves, our perspectives and our own motives. But God reaches down to us and disrupts our way of seeing the world. This is being revealed as we move through the 6th chapter of John a bit more and we see Jesus in the aftermath of the feeding of the 5,000. Jesus fed them all and had leftovers, walked on water, and began explaining that it is God who has sent Jesus and promises to fill them with good things always. And in our latest installment of the story, Jesus reveals that God’s way is different from our way. God’s promises are richer than we could ever imagine, God’s love is deeper than we will ever know and God’s grace is more expansive than we can wrap our heads around. Jesus is using the very ordinary, everyday bread to try and get the crowds to catch a glimpse of what God is up to in the world through Jesus. This isn’t about following certain rules, being in the right place at the right time, or some sort of magical experience. No, this is about the reign of God that really frees those who are in any captivity, that really feeds all who are hungry, that really gives hope to the hopeless and mercy to the brokenhearted. This is God walking around with us in our ordinary lives, loving us and forgiving us in concrete, ordinary ways that reveals more plainly than we are willing to admit that God is in everything, in everyone, and is everywhere, all of the time. God is in the ordinary bread and the crowds, more accurately translated as the Judeans than the Jews, won’t believe it.
Jesus is special? This carpenter’s son? This boy with whom we used to go to synagogue? This dirty, scruffy, rough around the edges guy who hangs out with even dirtier, scruffier and rougher people is going to give us the eternal life with God? God has come down to us here on this ordinary countryside and not in the temple?
Like the Judeans, we don’t recognize Jesus all of the time because we like God clean, in pure white robes, holy in a special place and only on high holy holidays. You know so that we can control and keep track of where God is, what God is doing and who or what God is working through. We like God in a nice pretty box with a bow. That makes more sense to us. After all, that’s how we think about our lives with each other, some people have more status and clout and they often look like it. There are just certain people who should be kept at a distance, such as celebrities, politicians and those whom we might admire.
But praise God, that’s not how God works. God sees the extraordinary in the ordinary. God created us, ordinary people, in God’s extraordinary image for relationship with us. Jesus, as God made flesh (you’ll recall from John 1), is all about God’s deep desire to be with us. God’s motive is only to offer us all of Godself, as everything and the only thing that we need, even if we can’t recognize it. It’s not magic, it’s not self serving, it’s not God in a special place with special things, it’s God in the ordinary, objects and people so plain, that we are apt to miss it as the crowds did.
It’s completely extraordinary that Jesus gathers us, ordinary people, with ordinary lives, each week around an ordinary wooden table, with bread we bought at an ordinary grocery store and frankly pretty cheap, ordinary wine and grape juice. But don’t miss it, the ordinary becomes the extraordinary because the love and mercy of Jesus reveals our relationship with God. Jesus is present and promises to be in the ordinary each and every day of our lives, not just in beautiful worship spaces on Sunday mornings. It’s extraordinary that Jesus is sent to gather all people to God for eternal relationship with God and, extraordinarily, with each other, since all are created in God’s image. The extraordinary work of God is not nice and neat, it’s not linear, we don’t always see it, or get it but Jesus says that God is always at work where you least expect it. It might look like a pack of gum from the impulse aisle or a dirty, messy throng of people eating bread and fish with bare hands on the ground.
God is always at work in our relationships at our jobs, our schools, and in our neighborhoods. God is at work in our political systems, our social systems and anywhere two or three are gathered, so yes, even the DMV! I saw God at work this weekend as I ran the Ragnar Relay Race with 11 other pastors in the mountains. You would think that it would all be very competitive at a running race, but it was a place where I watched strangers offer encouragement, water, accompaniment, food, rest, and relationship. Ordinary water shared, revealed God’s work of relationship with us and for each other, ordinary food shared God’s work of nourishing us and each other, ordinary words of encouragement shared God’s work of caring for our spirit and for each others spirits.
Where will you see God’s extraordinary work in the ordinary this week? How will we as a community reveal the work that God is doing in us, for us, and with us for the sake of the world? Ordinary bread, ordinary wine, ordinary water, ordinary words do extraordinary things in the kingdom of God. We are transformed by these ordinary things to be the extraordinary people that God created us to be. God’s extraordinary love is at work in you, in me and in all of creation. Jesus has indeed come to us from heaven, from God’s kingdom as an ordinary person, not be set apart but to walk with us, each and every ordinary day, offering us deep and real relationship with God, now and forever. Thanks be to God!